teeth care

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Questions:I seem to recall that my first electric toothbrush came with directions not to use toothpaste.  My current one has no such restrictions, but do I need it?

Answer:You can brush without a toothpaste (only with water), but it won’t be as effective as with one.
The most important aspect of using a toothpaste is the its ability to increase fluoride levels in the oral cavity. Fluoride will strengthen the teeth against acids produced by bacteria as a byproduct of their metabolism.
Just make sure to choose a low abrasive toothpaste; plain with no granules inside is you’re best choice.

There are a couple of different types of electric toothbrushes. One type uses vibration, the other uses rotation-oscillation. It is believed that the rotation-oscillation type is more effective at reducing plaque. In addition, some electric toothbrushes generate an ultrasonic wave to clean the teeth. There are also numerous styles of brush heads, designed for deep cleaning, for sensitive teeth and gums, for patients with orthodontic braces, and so on.

With all that extra power and polishing, the type of toothpaste you choose becomes extra important. If the toothpaste is too abrasive, it can erode tooth enamel. Most electronic toothbrush manufacturers recommend a gel-type toothpaste for use with their equipment.

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The first and the biggest reason to have receding gums one is age; if you’re above 40, you’re likely to get it. The other reason is bad oral hygiene. If you don’t floss or skip brushing, chances of getting serious periodontal diseases are high. And that’s what receding gums are a symptom of.

They are a sign of periodontal disease, which means if you start experiencing problems with your teeth, like loose teeth or bleeding gums, the worse is yet to come. The most unfortunate news is that gums cannot grow back. They stay like that and the only way to get them back is by a gum graft surgery. The other thing is, receding gums can also occur due to harsh brushing. This causes the enamel to corrode and the gums to get injured.

When it occurs, the gum line that surrounds the teeth starts to expose more of the tooth as it wears away. Receding gums are considered to be one of the early signs of gum disease. However, there’re ways to treat and reverse the gum recession. One of the ways is to switch to an electric toothbrush and to help you find the right one we have created this best electric toothbrush for receding gums review. Some of the electric toothbrushes are equipped with a pressure sensor that alerts the person each time too much pressure is applied. Electric toothbrushes also help to stick with correct brushing technique.To treat receding gums you not only need to change your toothbrush but also change the way you brush.

If you’re changing the toothbrush it’s better to find one that comes with softer bristles, as the hard bristles can only aggravate the problem. Also instead of manual flossing in the case of receding gums a good alternative would be a water flosser. One of the best ones for this is the Waterpik Ultra water flosser.

The best toothbrushes for receding gums are made by the most popular brands: Sonicare  are effective and have their benefits.

Check out the latest Sonicare DiamondClean pricing info here!

 

This is one of the best electric toothbrushes in the Sonicare line. It features the patented sonic technology, the sweeping motions of which drive fluids along your gum line helping to stimulate them. Its 31,000 brush strokes per minute also help to drive fluids deep between the teeth to effectively remove plaque even from tight spaces. Its useful features make it the best electric toothbrush for treating receding gums.

Philips Sonicare Diamond Clean electric toothbrush is designed to improve the health of the gums in just 2 weeks. It’s got 5 different modes. For those who have receding gums, it offers the Gum Care and Sensitive modes. The Gum Care is provided for 3 minute brushing to improve gingival health. The Sensitive mode works with a more gentle motion of the brush, making it suitable for those who have sensitive teeth and helping with gingival health.

It comes with 2 brush heads, a travel case with a USB charger, and a charging glass with a multi-voltage base.

CHECK THE TO READ MORE REVIEWS

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Here are a few tips to keep your toothbrush germs and bacteria free… and healthy.

Change your brush head frequently

It is highly recommended to change the brush heads every 3 months, at least. However, in some cases, more often is better. For example, you might want to change your brush head after being sick, if you have a weaker immune system or if the toothbrush head has been worn out (for example, if the bristles are not straight anymore.

Put away your toothbrush

Rinse thoroughly your brush head after brushing your teeth. You should keep your toothbrush in a vertical position and not lying down against the counter top, where bacteria can grow. Humid environments are more conducive to bacterial growth, therefore avoid covering the head of your toothbrush as this increase germs growth and dry your toothbrush between brushing (shake it dry and air dry).

Also keep your toothbrush as far as possible from the toilets…

Brush your teeth… well

To reduce the amount of bacteria and germs on your brush head, you can try using mouthwash before brushing. However brushing your teeth twice a day can and will also achieve the same results. Indeed, the less germs in your mouth, the less germs on your toothbrush…

Bacteria and oral health

Although we talked a lot about the bad sides of bacterial growth, there is another side tobacteria. As a matter of fact, they play two roles. First, we know their bad side, where their excessive growth leads to gingivitis, cavities, dental plaque and some types of infections. On the other hand, some bacteria are useful, even necessary to control the growth of fungus and to maintain a healthy mouth.

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It’s hard to make kids brush their teeth – The fact is, most people don’t tend to brush for long enough. The average adult spends just 46 seconds brushing, which is well short of the dentist recommended 2 minutes. When timing themselves, people are 50% more likely to brush for the right amount of time. You stand in front of the mirror and stare at yourself while you jiggle a bristled stick around your mouth for two minutes. In that time, you get to notice all the little imperfections, like that pimple that will blossom into glorious acne tomorrow morning. Now, though, there’s a solution – Brush DJ, an app for your phone that is so much more than a toothbrush timer.

Rock out while you get that plaque out!

Brush DJ is a free application for Apple and Android devices, designed by dentist Ben Underwood to make brushing more fun. With a fully randomized timer that pulls music from the location you set, it plays for two minutes while you brush your teeth. This means that each morning and night are totally different scenarios, and you can dance around while making sure your pearly whites remain pearly white.

Never forget again.

In addition to playing your favourite tunes, Brush DJ has a timer that you can set for specific times to remind you to brush your teeth. This can be set for different times on weekends, allowing you to sleep in without being bothered by an alarm. It also reminds you of proper brushing technique, such as not washing your mouth out afterward. The application also informs you to use a fluoride mouthwash to help guard your teeth against decay. There is even a reminder to tell you to floss and get between your teeth. You can no longer claim, “I forgot!” as an excuse not to floss.

It’s like having a dentist in your pocket all the time.

This app also allows you to set long term reminders of when you last paid a visit to your dentist, and when exactly you need to go again. Brushing too much canbe just as bad as not brushing enough, which is why having a  timer, is important. Studies have shown that two minutes, twice a day, is the optimal time for clearing out the plaque without wearing down your teeth.

Perfect for all age groups.

Are you an adult, and would prefer to listen to smooth jazz in the morning? Give Brush DJ a playlist to pull from. Children can also set all their upbeat, happy tunes to play, giving them a reason to look forward to something that is all too often viewed as a chore. Before you know it, kids may begin looking forward to toothbrush time, instead of avoiding it!

Brush DJ is an app designed to make brushing your teeth fun, but also to help improve
awareness of overall dental hygiene and guide people towards making better decisions when it comes to their teeth. At absolutely no cost, what have you go to lose? Visit Brush DJ at their website  where they also have a couple of really great videos well worth watching.   Or just click on the icons below for immediate download of this must have app.

download apple storedownload google play logo

 

 

 

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There’s more to keeping you pearly whites precisely that than a bit of brushing and the odd visit to a dentist. Take a look at these dental dos and don’ts.

#1 Avoid Fizzy Drinks

Carbonated drinks (including the diet variety and sparkling water) can cause your teeth to look older than they really are. These drinks are so highly acidic that they can actually dissolve the upper layers of the tooth. They contain high amounts of phosphorus – a mineral that can leach calcium from your bones if you consume too much and some scientists believe they can weaken your jawbone, increasing the chance of losing teeth.

Some researchers believe calcium is first robbed not from your hips or spine but from your jaw, leading to tooth loss. We see a number of young people who have the jaws of much older people, because of poor dietary habits such as drinking soda, along with not getting enough calcium.

#2 Chew your Food

Foods that work on the teeth like detergents are foods that require chewing. Apples, celery and carrots clean teeth naturally and foods such a spinach, lettuce and broccoli prevent staining by creating a film on the teeth that acts like a barrier. Major strainers will take their toll on your smile sooner of later, so steer clear of tea, coffee, red wine, and highly pigmented foods such as cherries and blueberries anything in fact, that will stain a white shirt.

#3 Don’t take Drugs

Ecstasy causes jaw clenching in users. A study found that 60 per cent of ecstasy users examined had worn their teeth through the enamel and into the underlying dentine, compared with only 11 per cent of non-users. As for cocaine rubbed on gums, it restricts blood flow, traumatizes the tissue and inhibits nutrition of the gums. Remember gums keep teeth in place.

#4 Quit Smoking

Smoking causes staining of the teeth and bad breath and increases the risk of oral cancer and gum disease, as it constricts blood flow to the gums. In fact, some gum specialists feel it’s not worth providing advanced treatment for gum disease in smokers, as there is very little chance of improvement. Smoking one pack a day for 10 years can cause a 10 per cent loss of bone support. Long term studies reveal that most tooth loss in 19 to 40 year olds is associated with smoking more than 15 cigarettes a day.

#5 Beware Bleaching

A professionally applied whitening system will not damage teeth. But some over the counter bleaches are so acidic; they can cause surface loss and sensitivity.

#6 Stop Biting Nails

Habitual nail chewers damage more than their cuticles; they can damage their teeth, too. If you have weakened enamel, you end up with an exposed, dented, soft area in the center of the tooth. And that�s when the problem occurs. The denting is much softer than the enamel and if exposed to bad habits such as chewing nails, opening beer bottles, it will wear down. Often the middle part dissolves quicker than the outside and the brittle enamel is very prone to chipping, making the teeth look uneven and unattractive.

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One of your greatest weapons to combat oral disease can harbor bacteria that can make you sick. That is why being diligent in keeping your toothbrush clean is very important and a great habit to get into, along with actually brushing & flossing. You use an

electric toothbrush and your mouth feels clean. You go back to a manual toothbrush and your mouth feels as if it’s been wiped by a silly bristly thing that’s spread plaque all over your teeth. But I do have an issue with this miracle appliance: cleaning it makes me feel sick. You can stop reading right now if spit makes you anxious. But I wouldn’t because if spit does make you anxious and you have an electric toothbrush, you’l need to know a way to store it that doesn’t involve something running down or through the brush to form a brownish circle on the charger (vomit!) should you store the brush on the charger as I do.

toothbrush-maintenance-image

I now follow this five step routine to ensure both cleanliness of mouth and brush without incurring nausea.

1. After flossing, brush teeth for for two minutes covering all surfaces and rinse.

2. Leave the tooth brush running, immediately hold the head under running warm water (cold doesn’t do it).

3. Turn the brush off, remove the head and run the handle under warm running water, taking care to get rid of all toothpaste, then wipe clean.

4. If you store on the charger wipe the charger base daily with detergent on a damp cloth, keeping your eyes closed if necessary.

5. However you store the brush, it should be upright and dry.

How to clean an electric toothbrush head

After each time you brush your teeth, be sure to rinse the toothbrush head thoroughly, getting rid of excess toothpaste or food bits from your mouth. Once a month or so, soak your toothbrush head in a solution of bleach and water (1 part bleach to 10 parts water) for a hour or so. Rinse thoroughly. Wipe the base of the toothbrush head with a clean white cloth dipped in the bleach solution (do this before soaking the toothbrush head). When the toothbrush bristles start to splay open, it is time for a new toothbrush if you have the one piece electric toothbrush or new toothbrush head if you have the two piece kind.

How to clean an electric toothbrush handle

Because the handle is an electrical appliance, it should not be submerged in liquid. Using a bleach and water mixture, dampen a small area of a clean white cloth. Wipe all over the handle. Dip a cotton swab in the bleach and water mixture and wipe out the area where the toothbrush head attaches to the handle (for a two piece toothbrush).

By using your electric toothbrush properly and taking care of it, including learning how to clean an electric toothbrush, you can be sure to get the longest life out of it.

 

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