January 2015 Archives

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There’s more to keeping you pearly whites precisely that than a bit of brushing and the odd visit to a dentist. Take a look at these dental dos and don’ts.

#1 Avoid Fizzy Drinks

Carbonated drinks (including the diet variety and sparkling water) can cause your teeth to look older than they really are. These drinks are so highly acidic that they can actually dissolve the upper layers of the tooth. They contain high amounts of phosphorus – a mineral that can leach calcium from your bones if you consume too much and some scientists believe they can weaken your jawbone, increasing the chance of losing teeth.

Some researchers believe calcium is first robbed not from your hips or spine but from your jaw, leading to tooth loss. We see a number of young people who have the jaws of much older people, because of poor dietary habits such as drinking soda, along with not getting enough calcium.

#2 Chew your Food

Foods that work on the teeth like detergents are foods that require chewing. Apples, celery and carrots clean teeth naturally and foods such a spinach, lettuce and broccoli prevent staining by creating a film on the teeth that acts like a barrier. Major strainers will take their toll on your smile sooner of later, so steer clear of tea, coffee, red wine, and highly pigmented foods such as cherries and blueberries anything in fact, that will stain a white shirt.

#3 Don’t take Drugs

Ecstasy causes jaw clenching in users. A study found that 60 per cent of ecstasy users examined had worn their teeth through the enamel and into the underlying dentine, compared with only 11 per cent of non-users. As for cocaine rubbed on gums, it restricts blood flow, traumatizes the tissue and inhibits nutrition of the gums. Remember gums keep teeth in place.

#4 Quit Smoking

Smoking causes staining of the teeth and bad breath and increases the risk of oral cancer and gum disease, as it constricts blood flow to the gums. In fact, some gum specialists feel it’s not worth providing advanced treatment for gum disease in smokers, as there is very little chance of improvement. Smoking one pack a day for 10 years can cause a 10 per cent loss of bone support. Long term studies reveal that most tooth loss in 19 to 40 year olds is associated with smoking more than 15 cigarettes a day.

#5 Beware Bleaching

A professionally applied whitening system will not damage teeth. But some over the counter bleaches are so acidic; they can cause surface loss and sensitivity.

#6 Stop Biting Nails

Habitual nail chewers damage more than their cuticles; they can damage their teeth, too. If you have weakened enamel, you end up with an exposed, dented, soft area in the center of the tooth. And that�s when the problem occurs. The denting is much softer than the enamel and if exposed to bad habits such as chewing nails, opening beer bottles, it will wear down. Often the middle part dissolves quicker than the outside and the brittle enamel is very prone to chipping, making the teeth look uneven and unattractive.

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Electric toothbrushes are more effective at cleaning teeth than manual toothbrushes, can help prevent tooth staining, and will lower your risk for toothbrush abrasion. If you have the money you should definitely invest in one.
There is a bit of a learning curve to using an electric toothbrush correctly. Since the brushing motion is done entirely by the toothbrush, all you have to do is position the toothbrush head so the bristles reach the right areas.

Before You Begin

Before you begin brushing, be sure to ask your dental professional for recommendations on technique. It also might be helpful to refer to the brushing instructions supplied with your electric toothbrush.
To start, apply a fluoride toothpaste to the brush head (and by the way, remember to replace the brush head on your power toothbrush every three months).

Two Minutes, Twice a Day

To brush your teeth correctly, spend at least two minutes using a recommended technique, which includes 30 seconds brushing each section of your mouth (upper right, upper left, lower right and lower left), both morning and night. Most rechargeable electric toothbrushes have built-in two-minute timers, and some even have professional timers that parse out 30 seconds for each quadrant to help you keep track.

Correct brushing technique requires that you develop a sense of where the toothbrush bristles are touching. Everyone’s teeth are different and applying one brushing method to all people simply won’t work. You must be able to feel the bristles slightly in-between your teeth and also along your gumline so you can individualize your brushing and know you are cleaning the right spots. I find that it is best to start using your electric toothbrush without toothpaste, wetting the bristles just like we did with manual toothbrushes. Without the distraction of the sudsy toothpaste you can really focus on where the toothbrush bristles are touching.

Positioning The Electric Toothbrush

When using a rechargeable electric toothbrush, it isn’t necessary to press hard or scrub. Simply guide the brush while it provides the brushing action. In fact, some electric toothbrushes, like Oral-B ProfessionalCare 5000 with Wireless SmartGuide,TM have pressure sensors that alert you when you’re brushing too hard.

Step 1: Make sure your toothbrush is charged. Many electric toothbrushes have charge level indicator lights, so you can actually see when the toothbrush is charged.

Step 2: Start with the outside surfaces of the teeth. Guide the brush head slowly from tooth to tooth, holding the brush head in place for a few seconds against each tooth before moving on to the next one. Follow along with the shape of each tooth and the curve of the gums.

Step 3: Repeat Step 2 on the inside surfaces of the teeth.

Step 4: Repeat Step 2 on the chewing surfaces of the teeth as well as behind the back teeth.

Step 5: Direct the brush head along the gum line and upon the gums. Again, do not press hard or scrub.

Step 6: Try grazing the brush head along your tongue and the roof of your mouth, back to front, to help freshen your breath.

 

 

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It’s hard to make kids brush their teeth – The fact is, most people don’t tend to brush for long enough. The average adult spends just 46 seconds brushing, which is well short of the dentist recommended 2 minutes. When timing themselves, people are 50% more likely to brush for the right amount of time. You stand in front of the mirror and stare at yourself while you jiggle a bristled stick around your mouth for two minutes. In that time, you get to notice all the little imperfections, like that pimple that will blossom into glorious acne tomorrow morning. Now, though, there’s a solution – Brush DJ, an app for your phone that is so much more than a toothbrush timer.

Rock out while you get that plaque out!

Brush DJ is a free application for Apple and Android devices, designed by dentist Ben Underwood to make brushing more fun. With a fully randomized timer that pulls music from the location you set, it plays for two minutes while you brush your teeth. This means that each morning and night are totally different scenarios, and you can dance around while making sure your pearly whites remain pearly white.

Never forget again.

In addition to playing your favourite tunes, Brush DJ has a timer that you can set for specific times to remind you to brush your teeth. This can be set for different times on weekends, allowing you to sleep in without being bothered by an alarm. It also reminds you of proper brushing technique, such as not washing your mouth out afterward. The application also informs you to use a fluoride mouthwash to help guard your teeth against decay. There is even a reminder to tell you to floss and get between your teeth. You can no longer claim, “I forgot!” as an excuse not to floss.

It’s like having a dentist in your pocket all the time.

This app also allows you to set long term reminders of when you last paid a visit to your dentist, and when exactly you need to go again. Brushing too much canbe just as bad as not brushing enough, which is why having a  timer, is important. Studies have shown that two minutes, twice a day, is the optimal time for clearing out the plaque without wearing down your teeth.

Perfect for all age groups.

Are you an adult, and would prefer to listen to smooth jazz in the morning? Give Brush DJ a playlist to pull from. Children can also set all their upbeat, happy tunes to play, giving them a reason to look forward to something that is all too often viewed as a chore. Before you know it, kids may begin looking forward to toothbrush time, instead of avoiding it!

Brush DJ is an app designed to make brushing your teeth fun, but also to help improve
awareness of overall dental hygiene and guide people towards making better decisions when it comes to their teeth. At absolutely no cost, what have you go to lose? Visit Brush DJ at their website  where they also have a couple of really great videos well worth watching.   Or just click on the icons below for immediate download of this must have app.

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